“Bidura” 357 Glebe Point Road

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    suburb
    Glebe (View suburb)
    ownership
    Govt/Institution/Other
    Historical, Visual,
    tree type
    Evergreen
    age class
    Mature
    setting
    Specimen
    origin
    Native
    height
    Medium (10-20m)
    spread
    Medium (10-20m)
    listing
    Local
    dbh
    Medium (50-100cm)
    Year Planted
    c. 1910
    Owner
    State Property Authority

    Scheduled Significant Trees

    Qty Common Name Species Locations
    1 Blackbean Castanospermum australe Find more locations
    1 Kentia Palm Howea forsteriana Find more locations

    Description

    The Black Bean (Castanospermum australe) has a height of approximately 15-16m and a canopy spread of 8-10m with a trunk diameter at 1m above the ground of 0.65m.

    The Kentia Palm (Howea forsteriana) is a single trunk specimen located close the house on the right had side of the entry, between the carriage sweep and the verandah.

    Significance

    The Black Bean (Castanospermum australe) and the Kentia Palm (Howea forsteriana) in the grounds of Bidura, 357 Glebe Point Road is part of the Bidura villa which is a heritage item scheduled in the City of Sydney Local Environmental Plan 2012. It is a representative example of rainforest species planting common in the late 19th century, early 20th century and has a clear association with the landscape context and history of this important 1850’s villa. They are likely to be planted in the early 1900’s and are considered to be historically and visually significant.

    Historical notes

    Bidura is the last remaining 1850’s villa within a garden setting on this side of Glebe Point Road. The building has historical significance for its association with the colonial architect Edmund Thames Blacket and R M Stubbs, F Perks. The garden setting, established trees and reinstated picket fencing along the frontage are important streetscape items.

    The Black Bean’s age and size suggests that it is as old as the ballroom, which was built in 1910’s.

    A Kentia Palm (Howea forsterianna) would also likely date from this period and was a common plant flanking the entry of such buildings.

    Other younger components of the site include two Peppercorn trees, (Schinus areira), close to the fence on each side of the garden, and the two palm trees (Washingtonia sp.) growing in close proximity to the Black Bean. This house has been restored and now forms the front of a complex of the Bidura Children’s Court. The garden setting, established trees and reinstated picket fencing along the frontage are important streetscape items.

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    Last modified: 28 February, 2014